Keratoconus

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Keratoconus (ker-uh-toe-KOH-nus) is a progressive eye disease that occurs on the cornea, the clear lens on the front surface of your eye. Keratoconus (which in Latin translates to “cone-shaped”) causes the cornea to become gradually thinner, which can lead to the outward bulging of the cornea. This can cause a cone like appearance to occur within the cornea. The disease can cause vision to become extremely blurry and many patients complain of sensitivity to light.

In the early stages of the disease, it can be corrected with glasses and soft contact lenses, but as the disease progresses, hard contact lenses will become required in order to see somewhat clearly. If the condition keeps progressing, a cornea transplant may be required.

Approximately 1 in 300 people living in the US develop keratoconus. The disease usually occurs in both eyes and typically develops between the ages of 10-25. The condition can continue to progress, but usually slows or stops as a patient ages.

Early detection is key as new treatment options such as collagen cross-linking (CXL) can be performed to slow or even stop the progression of keratoconus.

 

Learn more about collagen cross-linking (CXL) click HERE